IXD102 Group presentation research – Bauhaus and the New Typography

We decided that we would do Bauhaus and the New Typography. So I decided to begin to do some general research.

http://www.designhistory.org/Avant_Garde_pages/BauhausType.html

https://anm102pm.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/anm102-ch16-bauhaus-and-new-typograph.pdf

https://www.widewalls.ch/magazine/bauhaus-typography

To say that the whole graphic design industry owes its life to the Bauhaus movement would be a serious understatement. The Bauhaus typography is especially credited for the development of modern day graphic and industrial design. There have been numerous articles and studies on the effects of the German school on today’s art world, but today, we are choosing to focus on the Bauhaus typography and bring you the best of the best of this category. But first, let’s look back on what Bauhaus is, and why is it so important.

The Bauhaus School was founded by Walter Gropius in Weimar in 1919. The movement sought to utilize the 20th-century machine culture and create buildings, design, and furniture in a useful way. They encouraged the usage of modern technologies and believed that form follows function and that the artist and the craftsman should be united in one individual, and focused on the productivity instead of the mere beauty of the design. The Bauhaus School taught typography, and they were strong advocates of sans-serif type, as they believed that its simplified geometric form was more appealing and useful than the ornate German standard of blackletter typography.

Bauhaus style of typography is effective in conveying the message of the design. Balanced layout, harmonious geometric shapes, vibrant colors, and sans-serif letters in upper case or lower case fonts are simple but strong. Bauhaus layout was not only horizontal and vertical, but angled as well, or wrapped around objects. The influence on the modern day posters and designs is evident, as you can see the legacy of the German school on various book and album covers, as well as political posters and signs. One of the most notable examples is the poster for Barack Obama’s presidential campaign, heavily influenced by its German predecessor. So, if you want to see some of the fine examples of Bauhaus typography, scroll down and enjoy the simplicity and power of these works.

 

 

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