Has your invention got legs?

Invent 2016

INVENT 2016 awards are now open. Mission: to find Northern Ireland’s inventions with the greatest commercial potential.

INVENT challenges inventors, entrepreneurs, scientists and start-ups with proof-of-concepts and prototypes in science and technology to discover the commercial potential of their idea.  Entrants compete through rounds of pitching to win a share of the £33,000 prize fund, access to a global network and a place on the NI Tech Mission to California.

The competition categories include Creative Media & Consumer Internet; Engineering; Agri-Science; Life & Health; Electronics; and Enterprise Software.

The closing date for applications is 8 APRIL 2016

BRIEFING SESSIONS:

Invent will be holding a series briefing sessions across the campuses.

Register your place at:

7th March – Coleraine https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/invent-2016-information-briefing-ulster-university-coleraine-tickets-21447304465

8th March – Jordanstown https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/invent-2016-information-briefing-ulster-university-jordanstown-tickets-21448998532

9th March – Belfast https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/invent-2016-information-briefing-ulster-university-belfast-tickets-21449036646

10th March – Magee https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/invent-2016-information-briefing-ulster-university-magee-tickets-21449105853

Visit the INVENT 2016 website: 

http://www.invent2016.co

Be Part of a World Record Attempt

StemNet

 

Ulster University’s leading science and technology talents will be showcased at the inaugural Northern Ireland Science Festival taking place from 19 February to 1 March.

As part of the festival, volunteers are needed at the Odyssey Arena on Tuesday 24 February 2015, from 6.00am to 1.00pm, to help set a world-record for the largest practical science lesson.

This event is being organised by the Royal Society of Chemistry’s regional team, with support from the British Council.

The current world-record is for 982 students, so organisers are aiming to attract over 1,100 school pupils (aged between 10 and 13) to take part in the lesson.

If you’re interested in getting involved as a StemNet ambassador for that day, you could help set up the arena, supervise pupils and provide general support, – there is a lot of work to be done, but it promises to be a lot of fun.

The organisers will have a training presentation which can be undertaken online or in person, during a session in QUB on Wednesday 18 February at 3.00pm.

To get security clearance, all volunteers will need to register as StemNet volunteers through W5, you can do this on the W5 website (http://www.w5online.co.uk/stemnet/ambassadors/).

For more information contact, Dr Stephanie Nelson, s.nelson@qub.ac.uk

W5

 

Women and STEM: the impact of childhod influences

A campaign group has launched an online petition calling for publishers to remove gender labelling from their children’s books.

Let Toys be Toys insist that children should be encouraged to choose their own reading material, saying:

“Titles like “The Beautiful Girls’ Book of Colouring” or “Illustrated Classics for Boys” send the message that certain books are off-limits for girls or for boys, and promote limiting gender stereotypes … telling children which stories and activities are ‘for them’ based on their gender closes down whole worlds of interest.”

With female uptake of STEM research in crisis, is it time for us as educators to consider whether gender-based social conditioning is having an impact on would-be scientists?

Let us know what you think.

The Library Subject Team

Ulster role model Tara Moore wins recognition

blog Tara Moore getting her award

Professor Tara Moore has been awarded the prestigious WISE (Women in to Science & Engineering) Hero Award in recognition of the contribution she makes to health, well being, safety and improving people’s lives through science and technology.

Currently Associate Director of the Biomedical Science Research Institute and Vision Science Research group leader at Ulster, Tara has developed and delivered numerous innovative teaching and training courses for health care professionals to help them recognise, treat and prevent rape, child abuse and domestic violence. In addition, as one of the few experts in molecular vision, her research aims to improve treatment for debilitating blinding eye diseases, passed from parent to child.

HRH The Princess Royal presented the award at a ceremony in London. Thanking Professor Hugh McKenna and Professor Stephen Downes for their support in helping her to achieve this prestigious accolade, Tara said:

“As an educator and researcher, I strive to inspire students and staff to see opportunities to make a difference through science. Advancement of the STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering and maths) is imperative if the UK is to continue to develop and lead research and industries which compete in a world market.”

Warmest congratulations from the Library Subject Team.

 

 

Passionate about science? FameLab needs you!

famelab

FameLab is an exciting competition to find the new voices of science and engineering across the world.  The competition is now open and is looking for budding science communicators who think they can explain a science concept in three minutes. Entrants should be working in or studying science, technology, engineering, medicine or maths in the UK.  To apply entrants must submit a three minute video.  Deadline for video entries is 31 December 2014.

The British Council with the Northern Ireland Science Festival and Cheltenham Science Festival, will host the final of Northern Ireland’s FameLab competition at The Black Box, Belfast on Wednesday, 25 February, 2015.

Full information can be found on the British Council Northern Ireland website:

http://nireland.britishcouncil.org/

Good luck to all those who apply from the Library Subject Team.